Robots to do household work in S. Korea

Jul 03, 2006

Approximately 1,000 families in Seoul will use remote-controlled robots to perform household chores this fall, the Korea Times reports.

Project manager Oh Sang-rok of the Ministry of Information and Communication announced a test project, "Ubiquitous Robot Companion," that will include 1,000 households and 40 kindergartens.

The robots will clean up homes, care for pets, read to children and identify visitors, the newspaper reported. Half of them will be controlled remotely via cell phone.

Most of the software and processing work will be performed over the Internet, allowing the ministry to monitor activities and check for bugs, the newspaper said. Five types of robots, all on wheels, will be involved in this fall's test.

The robots will be relatively cheap, with prices ranging between $1,000 and $2,000. After the test this autumn, the ministry wants a robot in every Korean home by 2020, the Times said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Robot works controls of simulated cockpit: Introducing PIBOT

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Robot warriors pose ethical dilemna

May 27, 2014

With the increasing use of drones in military operations, it is perhaps only a matter of time before robots replace soldiers. Whether fully automated war is on the immediate horizon, one researcher says it's not too early ...

Japan sees future business in Fukushima cleanup

Mar 08, 2014

(AP)—There is something surprising in the radioactive wreck that is the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: opportunity. To clean it up, Japan will have to develop technology and expertise that any ...

Hybrid carbon nanotube yarn muscle

May 30, 2013

Professor Seon Jeong Kim of Hanyang University has created a high capacity yarn muscle that does not require electrolytes or special packaging. It will have a big impact in the motor, biological and robot ...

Recommended for you

Victoria team defend title with speedy robot

2 hours ago

A team from Victoria's School of Engineering and Computer Science, led by Robby Lopez, beat 15 other teams from Australian and New Zealand universities to take top honours in the 2013 competition with its ...

Flying robots will go where humans can't

Sep 17, 2014

There are many situations where it's impossible, complicated or too time-consuming for humans to enter and carry out operations. Think of contaminated areas following a nuclear accident, or the need to erect ...

User comments : 0