Volunteer loses digits after drug trial

Jun 26, 2006

A drug trial gone wrong has left a 20-year-old London man with the prospect of losing all his fingers and toes.

Trainee plumber Ryan Wilson developed gangrene in both his hands and feet after taking part last March in the test of an arthritis drug developed by TeGenero for U.S. researchers Parexel, Britain's Daily Mirror reported Monday.

Six men had multiple organ failure after testing the drug but an official investigation into the trial found no evidence of problems. The drug caused volunteer's heads to swell like the Elephant Man.

Wilson expected to lose just a few finger tips but at his last checkup doctors told him to prepare for amputation in a month.

His family does not know how long it will be before he can walk again.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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