Mobile film ticketing launched down under

Jun 26, 2006

Mobile ticketing solutions provider bCODE announced Monday the launch of its service for Manly Cinemas in Sydney, Australia.

bCODE's solution uses no 2D barcode or RFID-based mobile ticketing technologies but instead uses SMS text messaging and is supported by 99 percent of all mobile phones in the market including PDAs, the RIM BlackBerry, Palm Treo and Apple's iPod, the company said in a release.

"bCODE mobile ticketing gives our customers a simple, quick, and easy way to get their movie tickets," said Graeme Edwards, managing director of Manly Cinemas. "Receiving your ticket on your phone and skipping the box office queue provides movie goers with the most convenient experience possible adding to our philosophy of providing quality mainstream films and mainstream art house along with upgraded comfort and aesthetics."

According to bCODE, the SMS-only format of the bCODE Mobile Ticket, which can be forwarded to family and friends, is a series of characters that is electronically read from the screen of the mobile device and can be purchased from SMS to mobile portals, Internet and voice directory services.

And as the company further explained, the touch-screen enabled bCODE Reader is connected via broadband-wireless and could display personalized multimedia upon scanning including session information and special promotions.

"We are very excited to be launching our service in the cinema industry," added bCode Chief Executive Officer Michael Mak. "Our touch-screen personalized media delivery capabilities can enable many exciting applications for movies distributors and cinemas, and we look forward to showcasing that to the global industry at the Amsterdam Expo."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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