Cockatoos might halt pulp mill project

Jun 20, 2006

A $650 million Australian pulp mill project might be halted by the red-tail black cockatoo, although the bird has never been seen at the planned site.

The Environment Department in Canberra says the project needs federal approval because the rare cockatoo feeding area is about 2.5 miles from the construction site, The Australian newspaper reported.

The Southern Australia project is expected to generate more than 600 jobs during construction and permanently employ 120 people.

The Penola Pulp Mill's project manager told The Australian he was alarmed by the government's action, given that federal Environment Minister Ian Campbell had blocked a Victorian wind farm because of a perceived threat to the orange-bellied parrot.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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