British group seeks ban on EU egg imports

Jun 15, 2006

Britain's Egg Industry Council is asking that country stop importing eggs from certain European Union countries because of salmonella threat.

The call comes in the wake of a new Europe-wide study which uncovered the extent of contamination on EU farms, reports Sky News.

In the study done by the European Food Safety Authority, British farms ranked the third lowest with 12 percent of farms tested showing contamination, the report said. But other countries had far higher levels.

The report said the study found salmonella on 79.5 percent of the premises tested in Portugal, 77.2 percent in Poland and 73.2 percent in Spain.

"We believe that imports of eggs into the U.K. should be banned unless they have been produced to the standards required by the British Lion scheme, including vaccination of hens against salmonella, a best-before date on every egg and full traceability of eggs, hens and feed," said the head of the British egg council.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Pest-killing wasps and berry fungus

Dec 11, 2013

We know more about wildlife this week, thanks to research by two Canadian teens. Teens from Ottawa and rural British Columbia published their research in this week's issue of a scientific journal, The Ca ...

Mission to revive Malta's olive oil production

Oct 15, 2012

A green-fingered ex-jeweller with a mission to revive Malta's olive oil production practically from scratch, Sam Cremona munches on a tiny black "Bidni" olive and shows it off to visitors.

Lethal Atlantic Virus found in Pacific Salmon

Oct 17, 2011

The highly contagious marine influenza virus, Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA) has for the first time been officially reported after being found in the Pacific on B.C.’s central coast.

Omega acids could reduce bone breakage in laying hens

Apr 05, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A study has found that adding the right combination of fatty acids to the diets of laying hens can significantly reduce bone breakage during lay. The research could provide a potentially significant route ...

Recommended for you

How to keep your fitness goals on track

29 minutes ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

39 minutes ago

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.