Liking veggies, fruit result of upbringing

Jun 14, 2006

British researchers say they've determined the liking for vegetables and fruit is determined nearly entirely by one's upbringing.

The Cancer Research U.K. study reveals a love of foods such as meat and fish is largely inherited, but ensuring children grow up eating needed vegetables and fruits means encouraging them to do so from an early age, the London Daily Mail reported Wednesday.

The researchers also determined one's attraction to sweets develops neither from genes nor instruction, but rather from watching parents consuming such foods.

The team studied more than 200 pairs of same-sex twins to determine whether our taste for foods is inherited, to shed light on the causes of obesity, and to understand why some children grow up having unhealthy diets.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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