Calif. scientists battle Kiwi mud snails

Jun 12, 2006

Southern California environmentalists are struggling to find ways to control invasive New Zealand mud snails.

The snails hitchhike their way into waterways by clinging to boats and boots, animal fur and bird feathers, the Los Angeles Times reported.

While only one-third the size of a housefly, the snail eats large amounts of food that otherwise would have fed other wildlife.

"We've found there's not much we can do to keep them from spreading," said Steve Martarano, spokesman for the state Department of Fish and Game. "There's just no way we can contain it."

The snails were recently discovered in sections of Malibu Creek, Las Virgenes Creek, Lindero Canyon Creek and Medea Creek. The newspaper said their appearance in Malibu Creek has alarmed environmentalists trying to protect the endangered red-legged frog and Southern steelhead trout.

The snails were first spotted in an Idaho river in the 1980s. The creatures have since established themselves in rivers in 10 Western states and three national parks.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Tarantula toxin is used to report on electrical activity in live cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

MasterCard, Zwipe announce fingerprint-sensor card

13 hours ago

On Friday, MasterCard and Oslo, Norway-based Zwipe announced the launch of a contactless payment card featuring an integrated fingerprint sensor. Say goodbye to PINs. This card, they said, is the world's ...

Plastic nanoparticles also harm freshwater organisms

15 hours ago

Organisms can be negatively affected by plastic nanoparticles, not just in the seas and oceans but in freshwater bodies too. These particles slow the growth of algae, cause deformities in water fleas and impede communication ...

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

15 hours ago

Throw a rock through a window made of silica glass, and the brittle, insulating oxide pane shatters. But whack a golf ball with a club made of metallic glass—a resilient conductor that looks like metal—and the glass not ...

Recommended for you

Scientists see how plants optimize their repair

11 hours ago

Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found the optimal mechanism by which plants heal the botanical equivalent of a bad sunburn. Their work, published in the Proceedings of the Na ...

User comments : 0