Study finds way to cut sea lamprey numbers

Oct 03, 2005

Minnesota scientists say they've found a way to reduce sea lamprey populations in the Great Lakes by attracting them to areas where they can be sterilized.

Lampreys are eel-like, blood-sucking creatures that have devastated Great Lakes fish populations for decades. But scientists at the University of Minnesota have discovered a chemical sex attractant that draws adult lampreys to spawning streams, where the males can be caught and sterilized, the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press reported Monday.

"This presents the possibility of a whole new environmentally safe tool for controlling sea lamprey in the Great Lakes,'' said Peter Sorensen, a university professor of fisheries, wildlife and conservation biology who led the study with chemistry professor Thomas Hoye.

Experts say the discovery, detailed in the November issue of Nature Chemical Biology, might also help control other problem species, such as carp.

Sea lampreys invaded the Great Lakes during the 1920s and 1930s, depleting such native fish as lake trout and whitefish. In Lake Huron, lampreys are blamed for reducing the lake's trout catch from 3.4 million pounds in 1937 to nothing by 1947.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Masses of plastic particles found in Great Lakes

Jul 30, 2013

Already ravaged by toxic algae, invasive mussels and industrial pollution, North America's Great Lakes now confront another potential threat that few had even imagined until recently: untold millions of plastic litter bits, ...

Scents latest weapons in fight against sea lamprey

Jan 02, 2011

(AP) -- In the never-ending battle to prevent blood-sucking sea lamprey from wiping out some of the most popular fish species in the Great Lakes, biologists are developing new weapons that exploit three certainties ...

Sea lamprey up in Lake Superior

Aug 27, 2005

The number of sea lamprey has nearly doubled in western Lake Superior in the past year, according to Minnesota and U.S. wildlife officials.

Sea lampreys turning up the heat

Jun 27, 2013

(Phys.org) —Male sea lampreys may not be the best-looking creatures swimming in our lakes and streams, but they apparently have something going for them that the ladies may find irresistible.

Recommended for you

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

44 minutes ago

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Apr 19, 2014

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Study finds law dramatically curbing need for speed

Apr 18, 2014

Almost seven years have passed since Ontario's street-racing legislation hit the books and, according to one Western researcher, it has succeeded in putting the brakes on the number of convictions and, more importantly, injuries ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.