Medical journal to retract water article

Jun 03, 2006

A medical journal plans to retract an article that claimed chromium-contaminated water was not causing high rates of cancer in China.

The article in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine was conceived, drafted and edited by consultants for PG&E Corp. in 1997. The PG&E consultants submitted the article for publication without letting on they or PG&E were involved, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

A PG&E spokesman said its role should have been acknowledged when the article was published with the bylines Zhang JianDong and Shukun Li.

Journal editor Paul Brandt-Rauf gave the Journal a copy of the retraction he intends to publish in the July issue.

The statement said the retraction was based solely on violations of editorial policy, and there is no evidence that suggests scientific fraud.

The objection to the story was submitted by the Environmental Working Group, a Washington-based organization for advocacy.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Molecular method classifies patients with polycythemia vera

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle

55 minutes ago

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles ...

Eta Carinae: Our Neighboring Superstars

1 hour ago

(Phys.org) —The Eta Carinae star system does not lack for superlatives. Not only does it contain one of the biggest and brightest stars in our galaxy, weighing at least 90 times the mass of the Sun, it ...

Indonesia passes law to tap volcano power

1 hour ago

The Indonesian parliament on Tuesday passed a long-awaited law to bolster the geothermal energy industry and tap the power of the vast archipelago's scores of volcanoes.

Recommended for you

A VA exit strategy

2 hours ago

As the federal government plans its exit strategy from the war, now may be the time for it to rethink its role in providing health care to veterans, says a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Real tremors, or drug-seeking patient? New app can tell

2 hours ago

A 42-year-old investment banker arrives at the emergency department with complaints of nausea, vomiting, anxiety and tremor. He drinks alcohol every day—often at business lunches, and at home every evening. ...

User comments : 0