Hello? Their phones have changed, but teenaged girls have not

Jun 02, 2006
Hello? Their phones have changed, but teenaged girls have not

Cellphones come in many shapes, colors and sizes now, but the teenaged girls who use them may not be very different than the young women who were learning how to use telephones more than 40 years ago.

A University of Alberta study published in the May issue of Journal of Youth Studies revealed that a group of teen girls aged 14 to 17, while attracted to the cool and hip images of cellular phone advertisements, expressed that a series of advertisements they were shown published in issues of Seventeen magazine from 1960 most reflected their experiences as users. These ads for Bell telephones showed young ladies the uses of a telephone, including helping friends with homework and talking about boys.

Many of the teens interviewed identified with these ads and the importance of friendship and responsibility that they showed, said researcher Rachel Campbell, author of the study and a PhD student in sociology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.

In contrast, the freedom-filled world presented in many of today's cellular phone advertisements was not a reality in the eyes of these young women. They viewed their opportunities to 'go out' as limited, particularly when compared to their male friends.

Campbell's study also found that most of the girls she talked with were given cellphones by their parents to keep them safe - a safety that the girls believed was a real concern. The young women recognized their parents' worry and emphasized wanting to be good, responsible daughters.

Despite this, some of the girls admitted to occasionally wasting their parents' minutes, "fibbing" about where they were, or refusing to answer the cellphone's ring. Yet, Campbell said, "these actions never deviated far from what was expected by their parents. They still carried the cellphone and called home. They just wanted to create a space for themselves. With the cellphone many even said they 'felt safer.' "

Source: University of Alberta, by Bev Betkowski

Explore further: Best of Last Week – Evidence of quark-gluon interactions, new portable device hack and why we may never live forever

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Water crisis threatens thirsty Sao Paulo

2 hours ago

Sao Paulo is thirsty. A severe drought is hitting Brazil's largest city and thriving economic capital with no end in sight, threatening the municipal water supply to millions of people.

Canada to push Arctic claim in Europe

2 hours ago

Canada's top diplomat will discuss the Arctic with his Scandinavian counterparts in Denmark and Norway next week, it was announced Thursday, a trip that will raise suspicions in Russia.

Google to help boost Greece's tourism industry

2 hours ago

Internet giant Google will offer management courses to 3,000 tourism businesses on the island of Crete as part of an initiative to promote the sector in Greece, industry union Sete said on Thursday.

NKorea launch pad expansion 'nearing completion'

3 hours ago

A U.S. research institute says construction to upgrade North Korea's main rocket launch pad should be completed by fall, allowing Pyongyang (pyuhng-yahng) to conduct a launch by year's end if it decides to do so.

Recommended for you

Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions

1 hour ago

The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from a three-year study across five low- ...

Bronze Age wine cellar found

1 hour ago

A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.

Study identifies upside to financial innovations

4 hours ago

Financial innovations can make or break an economy. While the negative impact of financial innovation has been extensively covered, a new study of financial innovations before and during the last financial crisis indicates ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

nilbud
not rated yet Jan 21, 2008
So Canada is 40 years behind the states, tell us something we didn't know eh.