St. Helens again spews steam and ash

May 30, 2006
Mt. St. Helens Recovery Slowed by Caterpillar

Mount St. Helens displayed a Memorial Day reminder of its might, shooting steam and an ash plume to an altitude of about 20,000 feet.

"We don't know how much steam and how much ash," said Cynthia Gardner, scientist in charge of the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory said in a statement. "These are very short-lived events."

The event was not seen by many people, since clouds obscured the crater in southwest Washington state, the Vancouver (Wash.) Columbian reported.

Scientists said they believe the event was caused by a rockfall in the crater, corresponding with a magnitude 3.1 earthquake that occurred at 9:08 a.m. Monday about 1 mile west of the volcano. Mount St. Helens is about 45 miles from Vancouver.

"This is not unexpected activity when you have rock avalanches on the growing lava dome," Gardner told the Columbian. "These things happen fairly frequently."

A magnitude 3.1 earthquake is considered a minor event by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The volcano continues to grow at a rate of approximately 3 feet a day, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Utah supervolcanoes discovered

Dec 10, 2013

(Phys.org) —Brigham Young University geologists found evidence of some of the largest volcanic eruptions in earth's history right in their own backyard.

Recommended for you

Spitzer telescope witnesses asteroid smashup

16 hours ago

(Phys.org) —NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the ...

Informing NASA's Asteroid Initiative: A citizen forum

17 hours ago

In its history, the Earth has been repeatedly struck by asteroids, large chunks of rock from space that can cause considerable damage in a collision. Can we—or should we—try to protect Earth from potentially ...

Image: Rosetta's comet looms

23 hours ago

Wow! Rosetta is getting ever-closer to its target comet by the day. This navigation camera shot from Aug. 23 shows that the spacecraft is so close to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that it's difficult to ...

User comments : 0