Kentucky to launch state satellite

May 27, 2006

Kentucky's state universities are planning to launch the first state satellite next year.

Morehead State University, which has one of the country's four bachelor's degree programs in space science, is leading the effort, the Lexington Herald-Leader reports.

A team of graduate and undergraduate students from the participating universities will design, launch and guide KentuckySatellite or KySat. The cube-shaped Pico satellite -- 10 centimeters (about 4 inches) on a side and weighing less than a kilogram (2.2 pounds) -- is expected to remain in orbit for 18 months.

Morehead President Wayne Andrews, announcing the satellite program, said one goal of the effort is to show high-tech industries what Kentucky has to offer. The university and state development agencies have dubbed the area around Morehead "Silicon Holler."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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