Intel Continues Push Down Power-Optimization Path With Intel Xeon Processor Line

Sep 26, 2005

Completing an era in enterprise computing and signaling the beginning of a new generation of platforms and capabilities, Intel Corporation announced availability of its last planned single-core Intel Xeon processor. Intel also announced new low voltage versions of its Intel Xeon processor line as the company shifts to enterprise platforms with processors having two or more cores.

"We are aggressively driving the transformation to an entire new generation of multi-core servers. As the most widely-deployed 64-bit platform in the industry, Xeon is the clear server and workstation workhorse for business," said Diane Bryant, vice president of Intel's Digital Enterprise Group and general manager of Intel's Server Platforms Group. "And as we support the transition to multi-core enterprise computing, Intel is already sampling next-generation processors and platforms that will consume orders of magnitude less power and incorporate new platform technologies that deliver leadership manageability, virtualization and I/O efficiency."

As part of its strategy to improve power efficiency, Intel today introduced low voltage versions of its Intel Xeon processors. They include the 64-bit Intel Xeon processor LV 3 GHz1 with only a 55W processor power envelope and the 64-bit Intel Xeon processor MV 3.20 GHz with a 90W processor power envelope. Both processors are targeted at server rack and blade designs where space is constrained and power-efficiency is a priority.

Intel also introduced a new 64-bit Intel Xeon processor with 2MB of L2 cache running at 3.80 GHz that is drop-in compatible with the previous Intel Xeon processor platforms and continues to offer power-saving features with Demand Based Switching, enhanced performance and flexibility with support for Hyper-Threading Technology‡, DDR2-400 memory and PCI Express*. Additionally, Intel introduced a 64-bit Intel Xeon processor 2.80 GHz with 2MB L2 cache for servers used in small and medium business environments.

"Building on our history of delivering high-performance and innovative platforms to customers in high volume, Intel has an impressive roadmap of dual-core and multi-core Intel Xeon platforms under development," said Bryant.

In the coming weeks, Intel will introduce its first dual-core Intel Xeon processor, codenamed "Paxville." Originally scheduled in 2006, Paxville will deliver improved performance for both dual-processor (DP) and multi-processor (MP)-based servers.

In early 2006, Intel will deliver another server platform, codenamed "Bensley," including a dual-core Intel Xeon processor, codenamed "Dempsey," a chipset optimized for dual-core, codenamed “Blackford,” and technologies that will improve performance, manageability, reliability and productivity. At that time Intel will bring to market a dual-core Intel Xeon processor-based workstation platform, codenamed "Glidewell," also including the Dempsey processor, and a new chipset, optimized for workstations, codenamed "Greencreek."

To further efforts in reducing server power consumption, in 2006 Intel also plans to deliver a new dual-core processor, codenamed "Sossaman," targeted at power-constrained environments.

Later in 2006, Intel will introduce a dual-core Intel Xeon processor-based platform, codenamed "Woodcrest," designed on Intel's advanced 65-nanometer technology manufacturing process. Woodcrest, based on the company’s next-generation, power-optimized micro-architecture, will offer dramatically improved performance and greatly reduced power consumption.


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