Nike introduces iPod Sport Kit

May 23, 2006

Nike unveiled Tuesday the Air Zoom Moire -- footwear that connects to an iPod Nano through the wireless Nike(plus)iPod Sport Kit.

The kit also includes an in-shoe sensor and a receiver that attaches to the iPod enabling users to stay connected, by receiving information on time, distance, calories burned and pace stored on the iPod and displayed on the screen and real-time audible feedback through headphones.

And after a workout, users can connect their iPod to a computer and with help of iTunes automatically sync and store workout data.

Additionally, there will be a Nike Sport Music section on iTunes that will feature podcasts, workouts, special coaching mixes with music and voiceover instruction from athletes such as marathon legend Alberto Salazar, and Athlete Inspirations, playlists and audio commentary.

Nike will introduce six other footwear styles this fall that are Nike(plus) ready and designed to hold the sensor: the Air Zoom Plus, Air Max Moto, Nike Shox Turbo OH, Air Max 180, Nike Shox Navina and Air Max 90, it said.

Moreover, the athletic apparel and accessory company plans to release a range of performance apparel that includes jackets, tops, shorts and armbands designed for the iPod Nano and Nike(plus)iPod Sport Kit.

Suggested retail price of the kit is at $29.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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