1,156 dead in Angola cholera outbreak

May 17, 2006

The World Health Organization reported more than 30,000 cases and 1,100 deaths from cholera in Angola since mid-February.

WHO said nearly half of the cases have occurred in Luanda province, with the peak of the outbreak three weeks ago.

WHO reported 30,612 cases in all and 1,156 deaths, although reports out of Angola put the totals much lower. Some 7 tons of emergency supplies have been shipped in, but sanitation problems are complicating the response, WHO said in an official release.

The Angola Press quoted sources in the Department of Public Health and Control of Endemic Diseases as saying 61 people have died since April 20 out of a total of 392 cases.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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