Panel to evaluate U.S. math education

May 15, 2006

The Bush administration has created a nationwide panel to look at math education in U.S. schools and recommend ways to create competitive instruction.

In his January State of the Union speech, U.S. President George Bush cited studies that U.S. students are lagging behind other countries in math and in April created the National Math Panel.

Modeled after the National Reading Panel, the math group will look at math education in 15,000 school districts and by 2008 will recommend ways to teach the subject, The New York Times reports.

Former University of Texas at Austin President Larry R. Faulkner will be the chairman of the panel. Camilla P. Benbow, dean of Vanderbilt University's Peabody College department of psychology and human development, will be vice chairwoman.

Although National Assessment of Education Progress statistics show U.S. students improving math skills, eighth graders are being passed by students in China, Singapore and Hungary, the Times said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers suggest adding uncertainty to catastrophe models may help predictability

Related Stories

Refreshable Braille gets an engineer's touch

Nov 13, 2014

When Katherine (Katie) Cagen '14 was applying to Harvard, she made a new friend on campus who happened to be visually impaired. "I saw how much she relied on technology to be able to access her course materials," ...

Famous Feynman lectures put online with free access

Sep 02, 2014

(Phys.org) —Back in the early sixties, physicist Richard Feynman gave a series of lectures on physics to first year students at Caltech—those lectures were subsequently put into print and made into text ...

Recommended for you

Discovering missing body parts of ancient fossils

7 hours ago

Certain specimens of the fossil Dickinsonia are incomplete because ancient currents lifted them from the sea floor, a team of researchers led by paleontologists at the University of California, Riverside has fo ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.