Kansas temporarily avoids stem-cell fight

May 11, 2006

A proposed ban on Kansas-funded stem-cell research has been killed, but a legislative panel will reportedly examine the controversial issue.

A compromise reached in the final hours of the 2006 Kansas legislative session removed the proposed ban from the state budget, The Kansas City Star reported Thursday. But the compromise is said to be only a short-term victory for those who say a ban could hurt a broad range of medical research and efforts to lure bioscience investment to Kansas.

Conservative lawmakers and anti-abortion groups want to outlaw the use of state dollars for stem-cell research.

But scientists at Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City say such a ban would hurt vital research into cures for such diseases as cancer and Parkinson's.

"Anti-science legislation, particularly legislation that rules out certain kinds of research, would be devastating to our ability to recruit and retain the best researchers," said William Neaves, president of the institute.

Anti-abortion groups, which support a research ban, accuse lawmakers who argued against the ban of caving in to research companies.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Rats, reasoning, and rehabilitation: Neuroscientists uncovering how we reason

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

DARPA seeks new positioning, navigation, timing solutions

3 hours ago

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), writing about GPS, said: "The military relies heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but GPS access is easily blocked by methods such as jamming. In addition, many environments in which our mil ...

Lights out in Australia as Earth Hour kicks off

3 hours ago

The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the sails on the nearby Opera House went dark Saturday, as lights on landmarks around Australia were switched off for the global climate change awareness campaign Earth Hour.

Future US Navy: Robotic sub-hunters, deepsea pods

7 hours ago

The robotic revolution that transformed warfare in the skies will soon extend to the deep sea, with underwater spy "satellites," drone-launching pods on the ocean floor and unmanned ships hunting submarines.

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.