Cancer battle examines natural immunity

May 09, 2006

Mice that are naturally immune to cancer produce white blood cells that cured and gave lifelong immunity to other mice, a Wake Forest University study says.

"This is a truly remarkable phenomenon," researcher Zhen Cui told The Los Angeles Times. "It really needs confirmation from other institutions."

Cui said confirmation of the "clear-cut" results is possible now that enough of the naturally cancer-immune rodents have been bred.

He and colleagues, reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, said they believe the resistance discovered accidentally in 1999 results from the mutation of a gene they have yet to identify.

The added challenge, researchers say, is that the gene may occur on different chromosomes in different families of mice.

Reacting to the study, Howard Young of the National Cancer Institute said the idea of using white blood cells to kill cancer cells "is very exciting."

"But this is a mouse, and there is no guarantee that the same gene will exist in people," Young told the newspaper.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New technologies help people with heart disease

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves

Aug 14, 2014

Conventional wisdom holds that the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a viscous fluid, with organelles and proteins suspended within it, jiggling against one another and drifting at random. However, a new biophysical ...

Why white dogs are white

Aug 13, 2014

(Phys.org) —About half of all dogs show some form of white spotting which can range from a few white marks in the Bernese mountain dog to extreme white coat color in Dalmatians and white boxer. But why ...

Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

Jul 31, 2014

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, ...

Recommended for you

Endogenous hormones improve breast cancer risk models

3 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Inclusion of endogenous hormones in prediction models improves prediction of invasive breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the Journal of ...

With kids in school, parents can work out

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Back-to-school time provides an opportunity for parents to develop an exercise plan that fits into the family schedules, an expert suggests.

Ebola death toll rises to 1,427: WHO

4 hours ago

The death toll from the Ebola outbreak sweeping through west African countries has risen to 1,427 out of more than 2,600 cases, the World Health Organization said Friday.

User comments : 0