Sandhill cranes make a comeback

May 01, 2006

Environmental successes can bring environmental problems and now once endangered sandhill cranes might again be hunted in Michigan.

In 1931, hunting and habitat depletion in Michigan cut the number of sandhill cranes to 17 nesting pairs. Today, an estimated 8,000 live in the state.

But bringing the huge-winged birds back from the brink of extinction has prompted some people to call for a resumption of crane hunting.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service counted a record 6,754 sandhill cranes during a 4-hour period last November at a sanctuary northeast of Battle Creek, the Kalamazoo (Mich.) Gazette reported Monday.

The cranes are renowned for their pair-bonding dancing and some wildlife experts say the birds are known to be the best dancers of the animal world.

Now the sight of the dancing cranes has become commonplace in mid-Michigan and points north -- so commonplace that they've become a nuisance to farmers.

That has prompted an increasing number of farmers to call for a hunt, George Cullers, a district director of the Michigan United Conservation Clubs, told the Gazette. Cullers noted some western states allow crane hunting.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: China's latest survey finds increase in wild giant pandas

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows troubling rise in use of animals in experiments

3 hours ago

Despite industry claims of reduced animal use as well as federal laws and policies aimed at reducing the use of animals, the number of animals used in leading U.S. laboratories increased a staggering 73 percent from 1997 ...

NY surveying banks on cyber security defenses

6 hours ago

(AP)—New York financial regulators are considering tougher cyber security requirements for banks to mandate more complex computer sign-ins and certifications from the contractors of their cyber defenses, the state's top ...

Life-saving train design is rarely used

7 hours ago

(AP)—Nearly a decade ago, the U.S. secretary of transportation stood at the site of a horrendous commuter train crash near downtown Los Angeles and called for the adoption of a new train car design that ...

Climate change may flatten famed surfing waves

7 hours ago

On a summer day in 1885, three Hawaiian princes surfed at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River on crudely constructed boards made from coastal redwoods, bringing the sport to the North American mainland.

Recommended for you

A molecular compass for bird navigation

Feb 27, 2015

Each year, the Arctic Tern travels over 40,000 miles, migrating nearly from pole to pole and back again. Other birds make similar (though shorter) journeys in search of warmer climes. How do these birds manage ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.