Computer forensics is a red-hot job market

May 01, 2006

Computer forensics graduates have been in high demand since the field first appeared and now the demand is growing even larger.

In fact, Marcus Rogers, an associate professor at Purdue's College of Technology, says private firms are recruiting graduates in the field, making those graduates among most sought in the nation.

"Our seniors and graduate students in computer forensics are being recruited for law enforcement and private-industry jobs all over the country," said Rogers, a former police officer. "They are getting multiple job offers, and the starting packages are growing each year. There is huge competition to hire anyone with expertise in this field."

Private cyber-consulting firms work with both law enforcement and companies investigating employees or other workplace issues. Some larger companies hire their own computer forensics experts, who have rooted out employees using office computers for a range of crimes from harassment and fraud to child pornography and embezzlement.

Starting salaries in the field range as high as $100,000.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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