64-bit Linux Notebook, Cluster In-a-Box at Linux World and 12-Terabyte Storage System

Aug 03, 2004

Pogo Linux Inc., a leading Linux systems vendor based in Redmond, Washington, announced today an AMD64 Linux notebook; a 5U, 12-terabyte storage system; a turnkey Beowulf clustering solution, and other new products. Pogo Linux, a Linux World Silver Sponsor, is demonstrating all new products in booth 1273 at Linux World.

"Customers turn to Pogo Linux for the most advanced Linux hardware solutions and expertise," said Tim Lee, Pogo Linux CEO. "Enterprise IT customers want higher density, higher performance systems with the stability, power and affordability of open source. Our new server, notebook and storage solutions represent Pogo Linux's value proposition: Performance, best of breed configurations and Linux expertise backed by a responsive, experienced and knowledgeable support team."

The Pogo Linux KonaBook 3100 notebook is one of the first notebooks built from the ground up for Linux. Because Pogo Linux has control over the hardware and software, the notebook can be configured to customer specifications.

PogoLinux also announced a new cluster in-a-box offering that gives customers high performance clustering capability at prices starting at less than $28,000 for 16 nodes. While many cluster solutions are optimized for hundreds or thousands of nodes, the Pogo Linux ComputeColony Beowulf Cluster Series is available in 16, 31 and 64 node configurations and gives customers the performance of clustered computing with pricing similar to that to conventional server rack offerings.

Product details, pricing and availability

KonaBook 3100 notebook

-- AMD64 mobile processor with 64-bit computing capabilities

-- 15" XGA LCD display

-- Embedded wireless, sound, power management, and DVD/CD-RW Drive

-- Linux preinstalled with 2.6 kernel

-- Portable 64-bit Linux computing with Suse Linux or Fedora installed

-- Available: Now

-- Starting price: $2,299

ComputeColony Beowulf Cluster Series

-- Comprehensive turnkey cluster solution: Plug & Compute

-- Available in 16, 32, and 64 processor configurations

-- Includes head node, compute nodes, datacenter cabinet, networking equipment, and flexible Beowulf software and deployment options

-- Caters to scientific computing, financial modeling, and other processor intensive applications.

-- Available: Now

-- Starting price: $27,999

StorageWare 548 storage system

-- Quad Opteron processors

-- Up to 48 Hard Drives in a 5U rackmount chassis

-- 12TB storage server capable of data redundancy

-- Enterprise storage building blocks for high capacity, affordable storage

-- Available: End of August

-- Starting price: $14,999

Source: Pogo Linux Inc.

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