New test can predict return of cancer

Apr 28, 2006

U.S. regulators have approved a test that reportedly can predict who are at high risk for a return of cancer after surgical removal of the prostate gland.

The test, known as Prostate PX, uses advanced computer technology and digital imaging to determine an individual's risk for a recurrence of cancer, reports The Washington Times.

The test, produced by Aureon Laboratories of Yonkers, N.Y., has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is being marketed around the country, the report said.

"Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in U.S. men, with about 230,000 diagnoses yearly. Of those, 90,000 to 100,000 men undergo a prostatectomy, or surgical removal of the prostate," said Rob Shovlyn with Aureon Laboratories.

The Times reported about 15 percent of post-prostatectomy patients experience a return of cancer. But, until now, it has been difficult for doctors to identify patients who fall into this high-risk category.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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