UCLA gets $3.75M stem cell research grant

Sep 14, 2005

The UCLA Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine has received a three-year, $3.75-million grant to train scientists to conduct stem cell research.

The grant was the largest of 16 awarded by the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine.

"The aim of our program is to train basic scientists, engineers and physicians to become leaders in stem cell research," said Dr. Owen Witte, director of the UCLA stem cell institute and a professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics.

The institute will train 16 pre-doctoral, post-doctoral and clinical research scholars. Each will be offered various training options, including working with faculty who are leaders in cell and molecular biology, gene medicine, cell-based therapies and organ transplantation.

"This will benefit the people of California by providing high-quality training in the scientific, clinical, social and ethical aspects of stem cell research to the scientists and clinicians who will be developing the future therapies in this rapidly emerging field," said Judith Gasson, ISCBM co-director.

The institute's research focus includes HIV/AIDS, cancer, neurological disorders, bone and cardiac disease as well as metabolic disorders such as diabetes.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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