Obesity doubled in British children

Apr 21, 2006

The British National Obesity Forum announced that childhood obesity has doubled in the past 10 years.

Dr. Colin Waine, chairman of the forum, said obese children aged 11 to 15 are twice as likely to die when they are 50, the Daily Mail reported.

"This is serious news because obesity in adolescence is associated with the premature onset of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases," Waine said.

About 1-in-4 11-to-15 year olds is now considered to be obese. Between 1995 and 2004, the number of obese children increased from 14 percent to 24 percent for boys and from 15 percent to 26 percent for girls.

Waine also warned that obese adolescents have an increased risk of cancer. He blamed increased inactivity coupled with energy-dense foods for accelerating the crisis.

The annual Health Survey for England 2004 also found 1-in-4 adults is considered obese.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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