Study finds sex changes men's behavior

Apr 20, 2006

A new study finds men with higher levels of testosterone are more likely to make irrational decisions when shown sexual images.

The study was carried out by the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

It split 176 heterosexual men into groups, some of whom were exposed to various sexual images, the others weren't.

Then they were put in a lab version of a communal game where with another person where they had to decide how to split $10.

If they didn't come to an agreement, neither received the money.

The study found those with higher testosterone and exposed to sexual images agreed to less favorable splits than others, the BBC reports.

Dr. George Fieldman of Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College said the study shows men become impulsive when fed "sexual cues."

He said similar studies with women haven't found similar results.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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