Wedding ring use studied by psychologist

Apr 11, 2006

A University of Alberta psychologist says people who don't wear wedding rings are more neglectful of children compared with people who do wear rings.

Social Psychologist Andrew Harrell led an experiment, during which 862 caretaker-children combinations were stealthily observed in 14 Edmonton supermarkets.

Caretaker neglect was measured according to how often the caretakers or their young charges wandered more than 10 feet from each other -- too far to prevent most accidents.

Harrell found about 14 percent of the caretakers, with or without wedding rings, lost sight of their charges at least once. However, young attractive females without rings lost sight of children 19 percent of the time, and young attractive males lost sight 25 percent of the time.

"Past research suggests the absence of a wedding ring in North American culture is indicative of a lack of emotional commitment to marriage," said Harrell, noting his study suggests it might also indicate a lack of a commitment to one's family, including the children.

Harrell recently presented his research during the 17th Annual Warren Kalbach Conference in Demography at the university.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: The economics of age gaps and marriage

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Making wealth from waste

Jun 17, 2014

We have killed for it, enslaved others to mine for it, and even built a world currency based on it. Gold. Homer described it as the glory of the immortals. The Incas simply called it the tears of the sun.

3-D printing set to break out of niche

Jan 12, 2014

Some of the oddest items on display this week at the International CES gadget show were edible, origami-like sculptures made of sugar, their shapes so convoluted as to baffle the eye.

How Iapetus got its ridge

Dec 13, 2010

For centuries, people wondered how the leopard got its spots. The consensus is pretty solid that evolution played a major role.

Singers tell Congress: Money (That's What I Want)

May 04, 2009

Jack Ely, the singer whose 1963 version of "Louie Louie" still makes the rounds on oldies radio, lives with his wife in a mobile home on a horse ranch in Oregon. Ely says they share $30,000 a year from her teacher's pension ...

Recommended for you

Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

3 hours ago

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year's ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy ...

The economics of age gaps and marriage

5 hours ago

Men and women who are married to spouses of similar ages are smarter, more successful and more attractive compared to couples with larger age gaps, according to a paper from CU Denver Economics Assistant Professor Hani Mansour ...

Prophet's ancient seal provides insights from antiquity

5 hours ago

When a personal artifact of a religious leader is discovered nearly 1,700 years after its use, the object provides invaluable historical insights. Zsuzsanna Gulacsi, professor of Comparative Cultural Studies, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.