World's Smallest Gyro-Sensor

Aug 03, 2004
Epson Giro sensor.jpg

Seiko Epson Corporation ("Epson") today announced that a joint development effort with NGK Insulators, Ltd. ("NGK") has succeeded in developing the smallest*1 gyro-sensor of its kind in the world. The XV-3500CB, as the new gyro-sensor is being called, is scheduled to enter volume production in December 2004 and represents Epson's first salvo in a battle to expand the scope of its quartz crystal device business.

The new gyro sensor boasts unprecedented stability thanks to the use of a monocrystalline quartz crystal for the newly developed gyro element. By leveraging Epson's original crystal microprocessing technology, low-power analog circuit technology, and packaging technology, the joint development team was able to achieve a gyro sensor measuring just 5.0 mm x 3.2 mm x 1.3 mm, making it the world's smallest gyro-sensor with built-in drive circuitry.

This subminiature angular velocity sensor is ideally designed for use in systems that correct camera vibrations. The sensor will enable compact digital cameras, camera-phones, and other products to be equipped with a high-performance motion correction feature.

Epson is looking beyond its conventional domain in the timing-device market and is actively participating in the sensor market, which it has targeted as a new business area. Going forward, the company's efforts will be directed further toward the development of new products using motion detection sensors. Product development efforts will range from game machines, remote-control security devices, and so forth on the low end, all the way to navigation systems, attitude-control (gyroscope) applications and similar systems on the high end.

Specifications of the product here.

Explore further: US official: Auto safety agency under review

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fighting cyber-crime one app at a time

7 minutes ago

This summer Victoria University of Wellington will be home to four Singaporean students researching cyber threats. The students have been working with Dr Ian Welch, a lecturer in Victoria's School of Engineering and Computer ...

New window on the early Universe

7 minutes ago

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of ...

Packing for Mars

27 minutes ago

Like surgeons in an operating room, the technicians work gowned and masked in ESA's ultraclean microbiology laboratory, ensuring a high-tech sensor will not contaminate the Red Planet with terrestrial microbes.

Recommended for you

US official: Auto safety agency under review

8 hours ago

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

8 hours ago

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

8 hours ago

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

13 hours ago

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

13 hours ago

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 0