Minority youth education goals studied

Apr 04, 2006

A University of Alberta study suggests minority youths have higher educational goals due to their families' values.

Sociologist Harvey Krahn, along with Alison Taylor from the university's department of educational policy studies, used Statistics Canada data from the Youth in Transition Survey to examine differences in goals for postsecondary education among 15-year-old students.

Previous studies showed immigrant youth try to be successful in the education system, and their parents are aware of the need to do well in school. But other research has shown language and cultural barriers can stand in the way of immigrant youth.

"It is possible that such barriers might dampen educational aspirations," said Krahn. "So we were surprised by just how resilient these young visible minority immigrant youth really were, despite such barriers, and by how much higher their aspirations were compared to those of Canadian-born non-visible minority youth."

Krahn and Taylor found 79 percent of visible-minority immigrant youth -- people not of the majority race in a given area -- hope to earn at least one university degree in their future, compared with 57 percent of Canadian-born non-visible minority students.

The research is published in the Journal of International Migration and Integration.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Greek mound excavators: No tours please, too busy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New type of solar concentrator desn't block the view

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through ...

Cities, states face off on municipal broadband

7 hours ago

Wilson, N.C., determined nearly a decade ago that high-speed Internet access would be essential to the community's social and economic health in the 21st century, just as electricity, water and sewers were in the previous ...

Recommended for you

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing

2 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes.

3Qs: Citizen journalism in Ferguson

3 hours ago

Tensions have escalated in Ferguson, Missouri, following the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American teenager, by a white police officer. The incident has led to peaceful protests ...

Social inequality worsens in New Zealand

3 hours ago

Research by Dr Lisa Marriott, an associate professor in Victoria's School of Accounting and Commercial Law, and Dr Dalice Sim, Statistical Consultant in the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Operations Research, builds ...

User comments : 0