Cancer researcher Dr. Robert Miller dies

Mar 29, 2006

Dr. Robert Miller, a renowned U.S. epidemiologist who determined fetuses suffered damage at Hiroshima and Nagasaki has died at the age of 84.

The National Cancer Institute, where Miller worked for more than four decades, told The New York Times the epidemiologist died of colon cancer Feb. 23 at his Bethesda, Md., home.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Miller received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and his doctorate in epidemiology at the University of Michigan.

He was sent to Japan in 1954 as chief of pediatrics for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission to study radiation effects on survivors. Among his findings was that exposure to radiation before birth increased the incidence of mental retardation in children, the newspaper said.

He joined the National Cancer Institute, as chief of its epidemiology branch, in 1961. In 1976, he became chief of the institute's clinical epidemiology branch, a position he held until 1994, the Times reported. Miller also served as director of the institute's office of international affairs and was named a scientist emeritus in 1994, but continued his research until last year.

He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Haruko.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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