Computer sales rise 36 percent in Brazil

Mar 28, 2006

Brazil's personal-computer sales grew by 36 percent from a year ago, a research group found Tuesday.

IDC reported that more than 5.5 million PCs were shipped to Brazil, and the surge was most likely due to government incentive programs in addition to a fall in the value of the U.S. dollar, which made computers more affordable.

Moreover, there are greater hopes for the laptop market in the country to take off.

The Boston-based IDC's consulting director of Brazil, Mauro Peres, stated that "in Brazil, notebooks cost twice as much as desktops do, which results in more restrictive purchases. However, there is no denying that migration to notebooks is a reality in Brazil. Two hundred seventy-five notebooks were sold in Brazil last year, which is a 47 (percent) increase over the previous year. Such growth is meaningful."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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