Nobel prize winner Joseph Rotblat dies

Sep 02, 2005
Joseph Rotblat

Scientists around the world paid tribute to Joseph Rotblat, a Polish nuclear physicist and Nobel peace prize winner, who died at age 96.

Rotblat, who resigned from the Manhattan Project during World War II, died in his sleep in his home in London Wednesday, the Guardian reported Friday.

Born in Warsaw in 1908, he started work on nuclear weapons at Liverpool University in 1939 in Britain and was part of the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, N.M.

However, after he learned intelligence indicated the Germans were not working on a nuclear weapon, he left the effort. He returned to Britain and pursued medical physics at St. Bartholomew's hospital in London. He later co-founded the Pugwash conferences, a movement to discourage the use and proliferation of nuclear weapons.

Rotblat and the Pugwash group won the Nobel peace prize in 1995.

"He's been an inspiration to people all over the world. He devoted his life to preventing the use, spread or existence of nuclear weapons," said Robert Hinde, chairman of Pugwash conferences in Britain and emeritus professor at Cambridge University.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: New complex oxides could advance memory devices

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA HS3 instrument views two dimensions of clouds

23 minutes ago

NASA's Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument, flying aboard an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in this summer's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission, is studying the changing profile of the atmosphere ...

Recommended for you

New complex oxides could advance memory devices

10 hours ago

The quest for the ultimate memory device for computing may have just taken an encouraging step forward. Researchers at The City College of New York led by chemist Stephen O'Brien have discovered new complex ...

And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever

Sep 16, 2014

A team of researchers at Boston University and Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate ...

Tandem microwave destroys hazmat, disinfects

Sep 16, 2014

Dangerous materials can be destroyed, bacteria spores can be disinfected, and information can be collected that reveals the country of origin of radiological isotopes - all of this due to a commercial microwave ...

Physicists design zero-friction quantum engine

Sep 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —In real physical processes, some energy is always lost any time work is produced. The lost energy almost always occurs due to friction, especially in processes that involve mechanical motion. ...

User comments : 0