Sea lamprey up in Lake Superior

Aug 27, 2005

The number of sea lamprey has nearly doubled in western Lake Superior in the past year, according to Minnesota and U.S. wildlife officials.

The eel-like, blood-sucking, fish-killing sea lamprey is becoming a problem across Lake Superior, according to Jessica Richards, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service marine biologist in Marquette, Mich.

"The agency's overall sea lamprey population estimates jumped 23 percent from 2004 to 2005," she said.

Not only is the number of lamprey up, but the scars they leave on fish are up as well. Sea lamprey scars on big lake trout were up more than 400 percent -- 26.9 scars per 100 trout compared to 6.4 per 100 trout last year, reported the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press Friday.

So far, the spike in the invasive species hasn't reduced lake trout numbers, but that could change quickly if lampreys aren't brought back under control, state officials said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Masses of plastic particles found in Great Lakes

Jul 30, 2013

Already ravaged by toxic algae, invasive mussels and industrial pollution, North America's Great Lakes now confront another potential threat that few had even imagined until recently: untold millions of plastic litter bits, ...

Scents latest weapons in fight against sea lamprey

Jan 02, 2011

(AP) -- In the never-ending battle to prevent blood-sucking sea lamprey from wiping out some of the most popular fish species in the Great Lakes, biologists are developing new weapons that exploit three certainties ...

Sea lampreys turning up the heat

Jun 27, 2013

(Phys.org) —Male sea lampreys may not be the best-looking creatures swimming in our lakes and streams, but they apparently have something going for them that the ladies may find irresistible.

Recommended for you

Affirmative action elicits bias in pro-equality Caucasians

12 hours ago

New research from Simon Fraser University's Beedie School of Business indicates that bias towards the effects of affirmative action exists in not only people opposed to it, but also in those who strongly endorse equality.

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

Jul 24, 2014

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed ...

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

Jul 24, 2014

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often ...

User comments : 0