Stem cells to be injected into the heart

Aug 26, 2005

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center will begin a clinical trial to determine the feasibility of injecting a patient's own stem cells into the heart.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted approval for the trial that would have a patient's own bone marrow-derived stem cells directly injected into the heart during conventional heart bypass surgery.

The trial will involve patients with ischemic heart disease who are scheduled for off-pump -- beating heart -- coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. In addition to assessing the safety and feasibility of using a patient's own stem cells as a potential therapy for heart disease, researchers also will be trying to determine how many stem cells are needed to produce the best results.

Various studies conducted around the world, including a limited number performed in the United States, have suggested when patients with heart failure receive stem cells taken from their bone marrow, their hearts show signs of improved function and recovery.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough, research shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Venom gets good buzz as potential cancer-fighter

Aug 11, 2014

Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists will report here today. They have devised a method for targeting venom proteins specifically to malignant cells while ...

Better tissue healing with disappearing hydrogels

Jun 06, 2014

When stem cells are used to regenerate bone tissue, many wind up migrating away from the repair site, which disrupts the healing process. But a technique employed by a University of Rochester research team ...

Recommended for you

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

Aug 29, 2014

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

User comments : 0