Two new DNA sequencing methods unveiled

Aug 09, 2005

Two newly developed methods of decoding DNA are expected to be substantially quicker and cheaper than the existing method.

Writing in the current issue of Science, Jay Shendure and George Church of the Harvard Medical School reported development of one system, while a Branford, Conn., company -- 454 Life Sciences -- recently announced a similar development.

The company said its invention is "100 times faster and cheaper than competing technology."

Each of the two new methods of DNA sequencing, if they work as promised, would put the equivalent of a $50 million genome-sequencing center on the desk of every researcher and physician, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

A major difference between the two new methods is price. The 454 Life Sciences DNA sequencing machine is being sold for $500,000, although the company says it does the work of a $50 million DNA sequencing center.

The Harvard machine uses "off-the-shelf instrumentation and reagents," and is even cheaper according to the researchers.

The first human genome to be completed cost approximately $800 million. But in the future, Church told the Times, the procedure might cost as little as $20,000.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The electric slide dance of DNA knots

22 hours ago

DNA has the nasty habit of getting tangled and forming knots. Scientists study these knots to understand their function and learn how to disentangle them (e.g. useful for gene sequencing techniques). Cristian ...

Four new tuco-tuco species found in Bolivia

Jul 18, 2014

A research team led by Scott Gardner of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has identified four new species of Ctenomys, a genus of gopher-like mammal found throughout much of South America.

Recommended for you

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

18 hours ago

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed ...

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

18 hours ago

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often ...

User comments : 0