JVC Commences Volume Production of New 0.7-Inch D-ILA Full HD Liquid Crystal Device

Aug 09, 2005
Direct-Drive Image Light Amplifier

Victor Company of Japan, Ltd. (JVC) announced that it has extended its D-ILA (Direct-Drive Image Light Amplifier) lineup with the development of a new microdisplay device. The new 0.7-inch D-ILA full HD liquid crystal device is smaller than its predecessor 0.8-inch device, yet offers full HD resolution (approx. 2.07 million pixels: 1,920 horizontal x 1,080 vertical).

Volume production of the new device will commence in August. JVC is also developing the next generation of high-resolution imaging technologies for use in full HD displays, building on the company’s years of expertise and long tradition of original imaging technologies.

JVC plans to release full HD projection televisions in Japan and North America that will make use of the new device and the company’s next generation high-resolution imaging technologies.

The latest 0.7-inch D-ILA full HD device is the same size as JVC’s 720p (approx. 920,000 pixels: 1,280 horizontal x 720 vertical) 0.7-inch diagonal D-ILA liquid crystal device, yet delivers full HD resolution at approx. 2.07 million pixels. The development of an identically sized device enables JVC to standardize production equipment and manufacturing processes to achieve high quality and reliability, as well as cost savings due to enhanced production efficiency.

The latest device also makes use of new pixel surface smoothing technology that delivers high reflectivity to achieve the brightness demanded from devices used in consumer projection televisions. When combined with the high resolution of full HD technology and the high aperture ratio of reflective liquid crystal devices, the technology makes possible the development of high performance projection televisions that offer smooth, exquisite images from screen edge to screen edge.

Development Concepts
The environment for viewing full HD (approx. 2.07 mega pixels: 1,920 horizontal x 1,080 vertical) images is rapidly expanding with the widespread acceptance of Broadcasting Satelite digital broadcasts and wider reception areas for terrestrial digital broadcasts. These changes have created demand for powerful large-screen televisions in screen sizes larger than 50-inch, that offer high-resolution full HD images at an affordable price. Responding to this, JVC has developed a 0.7-inch D-ILA full HD device for use in high-resolution projection televisions. The new device, which will commence volume production in August, is smaller and lower in cost than its predecessor 0.8-inch D-ILA full HD device. JVC plans to release full HD projection elevisions in Japan and North America that will make use of the new device to augment its high-end range of projection televisions, which is currently composed of the company’s lineup of 720p projection televisions.

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