Japan to learn cloning skills from S.Korea

Jul 19, 2005

Japan will study South Korea's legal guidelines on embryonic stem cell research for "therapeutic cloning" to shape its policy on the morally challenging issue.

South Korea is at the forefront of research into therapeutic cloning -- using embryonic stem cells to find cures for such ailments as Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries and juvenile diabetes, the Asahi Shimbun reported Tuesday.

The cells, which may someday be used to produce human "spare-part" tissue, are the next frontier in regenerative medicine.

Japan's government hopes to build on South Korean research in compiling its own guidelines on embryonic stem cell uses.

The ministry is inviting South Korean researchers to an experts' workshop in late July to discuss progress made in this field and to exchange ideas.

Japan, like many other nations, has banned human cloning, but the government's Council for Science and Technology Policy decided last year to permit stem cell creation for therapeutic research aimed at finding cures for diseases.

The guidelines will cover such issues as how to obtain unfertilized eggs and what diseases can be researched using this method.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Marcellus drilling boom may have led to too many hotel rooms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Prosecutors target credit card thieves overseas

8 hours ago

Criminals from around the world buy and sell stolen credit card information with ease in today's digital age. But if they commit their crime entirely outside the United States, they may be hard to prosecute.

'Grand Theft Auto V' to hit PS4 and Xbox One

10 hours ago

Rockstar Games on Friday announced that the latest installment of its crime-themed blockbuster video game "Grand Theft Auto" will hit PlayStation 4 and Xbox One consoles in November.

Tropical Storm Odile taken on by two NASA satellites

11 hours ago

As Tropical Storm Odile continues to affect Mexico's west coast and stir up dangerous surf, NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites provided forecasters information on clouds and rainfall in the coast-hugging storm. ...

Recommended for you

Marcellus drilling boom may have led to too many hotel rooms

2 hours ago

Drilling in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale region led to a rapid increase in both the number of hotels and hotel industry jobs, but Penn State researchers report that the faltering occupancy rate may signal that there are ...

User comments : 0