Raytheon, Cessna Receive NASA Sonic Boom Research Grants

Jul 12, 2005

Two Wichita-based general aviation manufacturers are participating in research projects studying how to lessen the window-rattling sonic booms created by supersonic flight.

Four industry teams each received $1 million for a five-month study that NASA will use to set the specification and design requirements for a low sonic boom aircraft.

The teams include solo endeavors by Raytheon and Boeing's Phantom Works. Cessna has teamed up with Lockheed Martin. The fourth team is a partnership between Northrup Grumman and Gulfstream.

Loud sonic booms restricted the now-retired Concorde supersonic transport to trans-Atlantic routes between the United States and Europe and hurt the economic viability of the aircraft.

The aviation industry is looking for technology that will lessen sonic booms so that future supersonic civilian aircraft can fly over populated areas.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Astronauts to reveal sobering data on asteroid impacts

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA centers team up to tackle sonic boom

Mar 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —Since the Concorde's final landing at London's Heathrow Airport nearly a decade ago, commercial supersonic air travel has been as elusive as a piece of lost luggage. However, this hasn't stopped ...

RX J1532.9+3021: Extreme power of black hole revealed

Jan 23, 2014

(Phys.org) —Astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and a suite of other telescopes to reveal one of the most powerful black holes known. The black hole has created enormous structures in ...

NASA investigates the 'FaINT' side of sonic booms

Nov 05, 2012

(Phys.org)—Sonic booms created by aircraft flying faster than the speed of sound certainly aren't known for being faint, but rather for their loud, make-you-jump startle effect for those who experience ...

Low-boom supersonic aircraft model points to fast future

Oct 18, 2012

(Phys.org)—If human beings are ever to fly faster than the speed of sound from one side of the country to another, we first have to figure out how to reduce the level of sonic boom generated by supersonic ...

Recommended for you

Astronauts to reveal sobering data on asteroid impacts

8 hours ago

This Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22, three former NASA astronauts will present new evidence that our planet has experienced many more large-scale asteroid impacts over the past decade than previously thought… ...

Rosetta instrument commissioning continues

9 hours ago

We're now in week four of six dedicated to commissioning Rosetta's science instruments after the long hibernation period, with the majority now having completed at least a first initial switch on.

Astronaut salary

9 hours ago

Talk about a high-flying career! Being a government astronaut means you have the chance to go into space and take part in some neat projects—such as going on spacewalks, moving robotic arms and doing science ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Hubble image: A cross-section of the universe

An image of a galaxy cluster taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope gives a remarkable cross-section of the Universe, showing objects at different distances and stages in cosmic history. They range ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...