RR Sat Signs New Contracts with Intelsat For Content Distribution

Jul 08, 2005

Intelsat announced Monday that RR Satellite Communications, an Israeli broadcast service provider, has selected Intelsat to provide two new content distribution platforms in the United States and Asia, respectively.

In one of the new contracts, RR Sat has chosen the Intelsat Americas-5 (IA-5) satellite to distribute Asian, European and Middle Eastern content via a new direct-to-home (DTH) platform in the U.S.

IA-5 hosts a large international broadcasting community in the U.S. from its orbital location at 97 degrees W, presenting RR Sat with the opportunity to penetrate the U.S. DTH market and expand the number of viewers accessing its content.

In a separate contract, RR Sat has launched a new Pan-Asian distribution platform via Intelsat on the APR-1 satellite located at 83 degrees E. The platform on APR-1 will enable broadcasters and programmers to target cable head-ends across most of Asia, including India and Australia, using just one satellite.

"Leveraging Intelsat's global satellite fleet allows us to significantly extend our distribution network around the world and enter new markets," said Lior Rival, VP of Sales and Marketing at RR Sat.

"We know that we have found the right partner in Intelsat; they are proactive, efficient and cost-effective, which will allow us to keep growing our audiences around the world."

Ramu Potarazu, COO, Intelsat, stated, "Intelsat offers value to broadcasters by extending the reach of their programming and providing them cost-effective access to new audiences and markets - our relationship with RR Sat is a great example of this. In general, the Intelsat value proposition for businesses is simple: if you're looking for an effective way to reach new markets and grow, Intelsat can help."

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

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