Study of Kennewick Man beginning

Jul 06, 2005

Anthropologists are gathering this week in Seattle to examine the remains of a skeleton known as Kennewick Man.
The 9,200- to 9,500-year-old remains have been at the center of a bitter battle between American Indians and scientists who seek to unearth the skeleton's secrets.

"This is something that should have been done years ago," Seattle archaeologist Jim Chatters, who was the first researcher to inspect the bones after they were discovered in July 1996, told Wednesday's Seattle Times.

"We never dreamed it would take this long," Alan Schneider, the attorney who represented eight scientists in a case that went up to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

So far, researchers have conducted CT scans. DNA analysis done several years ago yielded inconclusive results but scientists are hoping to take more samples.

Earlier studies indicated Kennewick Man does not have the same facial features as American Indian populations. An early reconstruction indicated Kennewick Man resembled "Star Trek" star Patrick Stewart. A later reconstruction showed a wider nose, fuller lips and deep-set eyes.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Report: China to declare Qualcomm a monopoly

1 hour ago

(AP)—Chinese regulators have concluded Qualcomm Inc., one of the biggest makers of chips used in mobile devices, has a monopoly, a government newspaper reported Friday.

Scientists stalk coastal killer

2 hours ago

For much of Wednesday, a small group of volunteers and researchers walked in and out of the surf testing a new form of surveillance on the biggest killer of beach swimmers - rip currents.

Recommended for you

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

15 hours ago

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed ...

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

15 hours ago

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often ...

User comments : 0