iRobot Introduces PackBot Explorer Robot

Jul 01, 2005

iRobot has introduced the iRobot PackBot Explorer, a new addition to iRobot's combat-proven line of PackBot robots.
With new intelligent surveillance equipment, including three cameras, and greater flexibility to customize with sensors and other tools, PackBot Explorer is the ideal all-purpose robot for searching hazardous areas before soldiers and first responders are exposed to risk.

iRobot's PackBot robots are used on dozens of missions every day in Iraq and Afghanistan to safely identify and dispose of improvised explosive devices and search buildings and caves for the presence of hostile forces.

In addition to the new Explorer model, the PackBot line of robots includes the more advanced PackBot Explosive Ordnance Device (EOD) bomb disposal robot and the PackBot Scout reconnaissance robot.

The new PackBot Explorer is well suited for urban combat missions ranging from ordnance disposal and reconnaissance to search-and-rescue. It can easily enter areas that are dangerous or inaccessible to humans to relay real-time video, sound and sensor readings.

PackBot Explorer's articulating head and camera can rise 18 inches off of the platform, giving soldiers and first responders excellent situational awareness, so they know what to expect and can decide how to respond.

It is designed to quickly and efficiently integrate a wide range of third-party payloads, sensors and systems, including an electro-optical infrared thermal camera and laser pointer.

"iRobot PackBot robots have proven to be invaluable lifesaving tools on the battlefield," said Vice Admiral Joe Dyer (U.S. Navy, Ret.), executive vice president and general manager, iRobot Government & Industrial Robots division.

"The new PackBot Explorer allows soldiers and first responders to better see and address threats before entering the risk zone."

PackBot Explorer can be carried and deployed by one person. Its rugged, shock-resistant chassis can survive submersion in water up to two meters deep. It can climb stairs and maneuver rough terrain including rocks, mud, snow and gravel at up to 8 kilometers per hour.

PackBot Explorer features six additional ports for modular payloads such as optics and extra batteries, as well as multiple embedded sensors including a Global Positioning System receiver, electronic compass, absolute orientation sensors and motor temperature sensors.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Greenland darkening to continue, predicts CCNY expert Marco Tedesco

Related Stories

OrangeSec pair said Cortana visited Android

5 hours ago

Can, did, Cortana work on Android? A talked-about act at droidcon 2015: a presentation titled "Cracking Cortana." The OrangeSec team arrived at the Turin, Italy, event to show their work in a CortanaProxy ...

Mercury MESSENGER nears epic mission end

6 hours ago

A spacecraft that carries a sensor built at the University of Michigan is about to crash into the planet closest to the sun—just as NASA intended.

DOJ, FBI acknowledge flawed testimony from unit

7 hours ago

The Justice Department and FBI have formally acknowledged that nearly every examiner in the FBI Laboratory's microscopic hair comparison unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against ...

Dawn glimpses Ceres' north pole

8 hours ago

After spending more than a month in orbit on the dark side of dwarf planet Ceres, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has captured several views of the sunlit north pole of this intriguing world. These images were taken ...

Recommended for you

IBM earnings dip as sales fall again

7 hours ago

Technology heavyweight IBM reported Monday lower profits in the first quarter following another drop in revenues, this time partly due to the strong dollar.

Twitter expands privacy on direct messages

9 hours ago

Twitter said Monday it was making it easier to take direct messages private, carving out a bigger space for targeted exchanges on the popular microblogging service.

Innovation boosts Wi-Fi bandwidth tenfold

12 hours ago

Researchers at Oregon State University have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.