July 13 set for Discovery space launch

Jul 01, 2005

NASA has set July 13 as the Discovery shuttle launch date, the first U.S. space flight since the 2003 Columbia disaster.
Commander Eileen Collins and her crew are scheduled for a 3:51 p.m. EDT liftoff.

"After a vigorous, healthy discussion our team has come to a decision: we're ready to go," NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said after a two-day Flight Readiness Review meeting at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

"The past two and half years have resulted in significant improvements that have greatly reduced the risk of flying the Shuttle. But we should never lose sight of the fact that space flight is risky."

Read in details at phys.org/news4874.html

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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