Micron Introduces Very Low Profile Memory Modules in the 512 Mb and 1 Gb Densities

Jun 29, 2005

Micron Technology, Inc., today announced the availability of 512 megabyte and 1 gigabyte double data rate (DDR) and DDR2 very low profile (VLP) registered dual-inline memory modules (RDIMMs). Micron's VLP DDR RDIMMs are designed for space and thermal optimization in server applications including rack-mounted blade servers. Micron’s VLP DDR RDIMMs enable server design flexibility with a low profile height of 18.3 millimeters (0.72 inches), using vertical rather than angled memory sockets. The use of vertical sockets allows server system designers to realize a 62 percent reduction in memory area compared to traditional DDR RDIMM designs and increased air flow reducing thermal issues.

“Micron’s new high-density VLP RDIMMs significantly boost overall blade server memory capacities while remaining compatible with all existing RDIMM sockets,” said Terry Lee, executive director of Advanced Technology and Strategic Marketing for Micron’s Systems Memory Group. “Micron’s innovative VLP RDIMMs reduce the space and thermal challenges through advances in component and module design.”

VLP RDIMM availability along with Micron’s first-to-market validations -- 1GB DDR2 modules at Intel and 1 gigabit (Gb) DDR devices for all leading x86 server platforms, and sample availabilities of 110nm 1Gb DDR, 1Gb DDR2, 4GB DDR RDIMMs, and 4GB DDR2 RDIMMs, further demonstrates Micron’s memory leadership in the growing server space.

Micron Technology, Inc., is one of the world's leading providers of advanced semiconductor solutions. Through its worldwide operations, Micron manufactures and markets DRAMs, NAND Flash memory, CMOS image sensors, other semiconductor components, and memory modules for use in leading-edge computing, consumer, networking, and mobile products. Micron's common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the MU symbol.

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