Smart goggles track swimmers' laps, time

Jun 28, 2005

British engineering student Katie Williams developed smart goggles that help swimmers track their laps and time -- an idea Williams got when she was a lifeguard.

The Inview goggles use a built-in compass to count swimmers' laps and time instead of wasting their energy keeping track on a watch or a clock.

"If they have a watch on, a lot of swimmers will move their left arm differently, just to see how fast they are going," Williams told the BBC. "It's wasting energy for them really."

The electronics on the goggles, which Williams designed and built for a third-year industrial design course at London's Brunel University, will be about the size of a 50-cent piece on the rear strap of the finished product.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: How were fossil tracks made by Early Triassic swimming reptiles so well preserved?

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