Astronaut Studies Leg Muscles' Strength in Space

Jun 14, 2005

Astronaut John Phillips conducted his second run with an experiment on board the International Space Station investigating the differences between use of the body's lower extremities on Earth and in space. The Marshall Center's payload operations team coordinates U.S. science activities on the Space Station.

Expedition 11 NASA Science Officer John Phillips put on his customized Lycra cycling tights this week for his second session of the Foot/Ground Reaction Forces during Spaceflight, or FOOT experiment. FOOT investigates the differences between use of the body’s lower extremities on Earth and in space, as well as changes in the musculoskeletal system during spaceflight.

Phillips wore the instrumented Lower Extremity Monitoring Suit, or LEMS, which measured his joint angles, muscle activity and forces on the feet during a typical day on the Space Station. FOOT could help explain the reasons for bone and muscle loss during spaceflight and aid in the design of exercise countermeasures. This experiment also has significance for understanding, preventing and treating osteoporosis on Earth.

Focused human physiological and biological Space Station research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures to protect crews from the space environment will allow for long duration missions to explore beyond low Earth orbit.

Explore further: NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite team ward off recent space debris threat

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA investigating deep-space hibernation technology

10 hours ago

Manned missions to deep space present numerous challenges. In addition to the sheer amount of food, water and air necessary to keep a crew alive for months (or years) at a time, there's also the question ...

Slow-growing galaxies offer window to early universe

Oct 16, 2014

What makes one rose bush blossom with flowers, while another remains barren? Astronomers ask a similar question of galaxies, wondering how some flourish with star formation and others barely bloom.

NASA Soil Moisture Mapper arrives at launch site

Oct 16, 2014

A NASA spacecraft designed to track Earth's water in one of its most important, but least recognized forms—soil moisture—now is at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, to begin final preparations for ...

Recommended for you

'Twisted rope' clue to dangerous solar storms

3 hours ago

A "twisted rope" of magnetically-charged energy precedes solar storms that have the potential to damage satellites and electricity grids, French scientists said on Wednesday.

User comments : 0