Discovery Set for Tanking Test on Friday

May 19, 2005
Discovery Set for Tanking Test on Friday

On Friday, technicians at NASA's Kennedy Space Center will conduct a new tanking test at Launch Pad 39 to continue troubleshooting two issues that arose during the tanking test on April 14.

Image: Oxygen vapors stream from the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Hood positioned above Space Shuttle Discovery during the April 14 tanking test. Image credit: NASA/KSC.

Engineers will evaluate the liquid hydrogen sensors in the tank that gave intermittent readings during last month’s test. These sensors serve as fuel gauges to notify the Space Shuttle Main Engines to shut down when propellants reach a certain level in the tank. This is critical in the safe operation of the main engines.

In addition, they will also evaluate a liquid hydrogen pressurization relief valve that cycled more times during the first tanking test than is standard. This valve opens and closes to ensure the liquid hydrogen stays at the correct temperature.
When the tanking test is completed, preparations for rolling Space Shuttle Discovery back to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) will begin.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Hubble sees 'ghost light' from dead galaxies

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A look back at catastrophic space flights

Oct 29, 2014

An unmanned commercial supply ship bound for the International Space Station exploded moments after liftoff from a launch pad at Wallops Island, Virginia, Tuesday evening, with debris falling in flames over the launch site. ...

Deep-sea diver hand offers freedom and feedback

Sep 12, 2014

Bodyskins and goggles are hardly the solution for divers who need to reach extreme depths. The Atmospheric Dive Suit (ADS) gives them the protection they need. Recently, The Economist detailed a technology ...

Recommended for you

Possible bright supernova lights up spiral galaxy M61

3 minutes ago

I sat straight up in my seat when I learned of the discovery of a possible new supernova in the bright Virgo galaxy M61. Since bright usually means close, this newly exploding star may soon become visible ...

Fifteen years of NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory

49 minutes ago

This Chandra X-ray Observatory image of the Hydra A galaxy cluster was taken on Oct. 30, 1999, with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) in an observation that lasted about six hours.

Confirming a 3-D structural view of a quasar outflow

1 hour ago

A team of astronomers have observed a distant gravitationally-lensed quasar (i.e., an active galactic nucleus) with the Subaru Telescope and concluded that the data indeed present a 3-D view of the structure ...

Hubble sees 'ghost light' from dead galaxies

16 hours ago

(Phys.org) —NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened ...

Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

16 hours ago

(Phys.org) —As it soared past Saturn's large moon Titan recently, NASA's Cassini spacecraft caught a glimpse of bright sunlight reflecting off hydrocarbon seas.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.