Sony's Noise Canceling Headphones Reduce 'White Noise' by 80 Percent

May 04, 2005
Sony's Noise Canceling Headphones Reduce 'White Noise' by 80 Percent

It's a loud, loud, loud, loud, world but thankfully Sony is offering a way to escape from the racket.
For the intrepid traveler, residents of a high-traffic homes or anyone wishing to avoid excessive noise pollution, Sony Electronics is unveiling the MDR-NC50 headphones.
Noise-canceling technology uses a built-in microphone that detects environmental noise from low-frequency sources (20-1500hz), such as jet engines, leaf blowers, subway trains, server fans, and household appliances.

"As the market leader in headphones, we have leveraged our strengths in technology and design to offer this high-performance noise-canceling solution, which aims to cut unwanted sounds by up to 80 percent," said Jim Leahey, Sony's general manager for peripherals and enhancements in its Personal, Mobile and Imaging Division. "People want to make the most of their travel and commute time, while also making it enjoyable. These headphones offer some of the best sound quality on the market, packaged with comfort and style."

Noise-canceling technology uses a built-in microphone that detects environmental noise from low-frequency sources (20-1500hz), such as jet engines, leaf blowers, subway trains, server fans, and household appliances. Sony engineers have improved a noise canceling circuit that creates an equal an opposite sound wave to cancel such noise, creating a better environment for listening to in-flight movies or portable audio devices. For example, Sony tests indicate that the MDR-NC50 headphones offer a 14db reduction of sounds at the 300hz level.

Using 40 mm drivers and neodymium magnets in combination with its noise cancellation circuitry, the MDR-NC50 headphones provide the audio quality and clarity of a home listening headphone - even when they're used far from home.

These headphones are also designed for use in both active and passive modes, so when the environment changes and noise canceling features are no longer needed, the headphones can be turned off and used as high-quality, conventional headphones.

For times when you need to listen to travel announcements or interact with others, a monitor switch located on the outside of the left earpiece allows temporary suspension of the noise canceling properties and audio output of the headphones.

These headphones will be available in major retailers for about $200 in June.

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