Mitsubishi Electric Develops Industry's Thinnest 2 Megapixel CCD Camera Module

Jul 14, 2004

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation has developed a 2 megapixel CCD camera module which is a mere 7.42mm wide, making it the industry’s thinnest (as of May 30, 2004). Sample shipments will be available during July 2004, at a unit price of 15,000 yen (FOB Japan), while mass production will start in September 2004.

As the domestic Japanese and overseas markets for mobile phones with cameras continues to grow, so too do the camera’s megapixel capacities. In order to increase megapixel capacity and enable mobile phone handsets to be made thinner, we used the technological expertise and know-how gained from our module development to date to achieve the industry’s thinnest 2 megapixel CCD camera module.


The module features an advanced optical design and the latest mounting technology. The “super CCD honey cam” (registered trademark of Fuji Photo Film, Inc.) makes it highly sensitive and capable of producing high quality images, even in dark places with low illumination. The CCD image sensor, power supply and signal processing LSI were all integrated into the module, reducing the space it requires in the mobile phone handset and allowing the handset to be thinner. The 2 megapixel CCD camera module is of the same size and interface as the Mitsubishi Electric 1.3 megapixel CCD camera module, providing customers with greater choice, depending on their requirements.

Each individual module allows for fine control of the AE (automatic exposure) and AWB (automatic white balance) functions. The shutterless camera is highly smear-tolerant1, and reproduces color in a natural and lifelike manner. Selection of an 8-bit or 16-bit digitalinterface2 is also possible, plus the flexible printed circuit (FPC) can be customized in accordance with the customer’s wishes.


Explore further: US official: Auto safety agency under review

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

LAMP: A new tool turns on at SLAC's X-ray laser

Jan 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —A 2-ton instrument the size of a compact car, now available at SLAC's X-ray laser, makes it possible to capture more detailed images of atoms, molecules, nanoscale features of solids, and individual ...

High-resolution microscopy without a lens

Sep 05, 2012

(Phys.org)—Over the past several years, major advances have been made at UCLA in the field of lens-less computational imaging technology, particularly in the design of lens-free holographic microscopes, which, because of ...

Recommended for you

US official: Auto safety agency under review

4 hours ago

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

4 hours ago

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

5 hours ago

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

9 hours ago

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

9 hours ago

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 0