Samsung Intros 3D Game Phones with Vibration

Apr 08, 2005
Samsung Intros 3D Game Phones with Vibration

Samsung Electronics introduced 3D game phones (models: SPH-G1000, SCH-G100) with vibration capability. The phone delivers realistic images and true-to-life sound, while the vibration it sends to the user's hand provides an extra sensation to the game experience. During an auto racing game, for example, the mobile phone vibrates as the player's car bumps over gravel or other unpaved surfaces, adding realism to virtual reality.

Samsung has also built in an industry-leading 1 million polygon*/second graphic accelerator chip. This device enhances the dynamism and realism of the images.

The 3D accelerator chip includes a “mixed graphics” capability that displays 2D and 3D images simultaneously for greater visual effect. This functionality allows the game's background to be displayed in 2D, while the people and other elements are shown in 3D.

Importantly, the game phone features a unique “multi-key,” which operates in eight directions, along with dedicated game keys. The user can command the action figure in the game to jump or fire a weapon at the same time that it is changing directions.

Dual speakers are built into the phone to provide high true-to-life stereo sound during play of games. The graphics-user interface allows the games to be enjoyed on a landscape screen for greater enjoyment.

The G1000 comes in a slide-up design and includes a 2.2-inch, 262,000-color TFT-LCD as well as a 1.3-megapixel camera.

Taking pictures is also a snap. Open the protective camera lens cover, and the phone switches automatically into camera mode.

The product will be available in Korea next week.

* Polygon is the smallest unit in constructing three-dimensional graphics.

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