Evident Technologies to develop advanced quantum-dot based anti-counterfeiting materials

Jan 17, 2005

Evident Technologies announced that it has received a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) grant to develop advanced anti-counterfeiting materials based on its proprietary quantum dot technology.
Work under the project, which is scheduled for completion in July 2005, will combine Evident’s recent advances in quantum dots and micro-resonant structures to create unique spectral barcode tags for high security applications.

Quantum dots are novel semiconductors with unique optical emission characteristics. Microresonant structures are optical devices engineered to allow very specifi c colors to be transmitted. By combining these two technologies, a wide variety of security tags can be created to produce unique spectral-bar codes.

The unique interaction between the two technologies creates security features that are nearly impossible to counterfeit, duplicate or reverse engineer.

"By combining fl uorescing quantum dots with a resonant optical structure, we believe we will signifi cantly advance anti-counterfeiting devices" stated Clint Ballinger, CEO of Evident Technologies. "Our goal under this contract is to produce advanced quantum dots systems compatible with a range of inks, UV curable epoxies, and polymers used on currencies and other documents. This new technology, with its complexity and breadth of application, should provide additional deterrents in personal and industrial security and counter terrorism."

Explore further: Graphene imperfections key to creating hypersensitive 'electronic nose'

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