Elpida Memory Develops Two New High-Speed DRAM Technologies Designed to Increase IT Infrastructure Performance

Jun 28, 2004

DRAM Speed as Fast as SRAM and DDR1/DDR2 SDRAM Produced on a Single 1 Gigabit Chip

TOKYO, June 28, 2004 - Elpida Memory, Inc (Elpida), Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that has developed two new high-speed DRAM technologies designed to boost the performance of servers, network routers, PCs and other IT infrastructure components. Elpida presented technical papers on the two technologies at the 2004 Symposium on VLSI Circuits, an international conference on integrated circuits held in Honolulu June 17-19, 2004.

The first technology, developed in cooperation with Hitachi, Ltd., accelerates route-finding in network routers and cache memory applications in servers. The technology incorporates high-speed memory arrays that use two memory cells per bit called "twin-cell memory", along with a high-speed data amplification method called "three-stage sensing". Based on these technologies, a 144 Megabit prototype was fabricated and evaluated using Elpida's original 0.11-micron DRAM process for general-purpose DRAM. The prototype achieves exceptional performance with random access time comparable to fast SRAM.

The second new technology developed is a circuit technique for 1 Gigabit DRAM devices that supports both DDR1 and DDR2 on a single chip by combining high speed with high layout efficiency. Incorporated in 1 Gigabit mass-production chips, the technology enables high-speed data rates of 400 Megabits per second (Mbps) for DDR1 and 800 Mbps for DDR2, making it possible to offer large-capacity, high-speed memory for servers and high-end PCs.

The original press release can be found here.

Explore further: U.K. grocery store to power itself on biogas generated from its own food waste

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New material puts a twist in light

2 hours ago

Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry ...

Controversial Alaska mine project wins one in Congress

2 hours ago

Supporters of the embattled Pebble Mine project in Alaska are making a desperate effort in Congress and the courts to keep it alive in the face of warnings from the Environmental Protection Agency that it could devastate ...

Recommended for you

Google made failed bid for Spotify

4 hours ago

Internet titan Google tried last year to buy streaming music service Spotify but backed off for reasons including a whopping price tag, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

Thieves got into 1,000 StubHub accounts

4 hours ago

(AP)—Cyber thieves got into more than 1,000 StubHub customers' accounts and fraudulently bought tickets for events through the online ticket reseller, a law enforcement official and the company said.

User comments : 0